Diane Hidy's Sightreading Flashcards Book Three (Studio License

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c major sample.png
B Major First page without key signatures.png
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flashcards 3.png
c major sample.png
B Major First page without key signatures.png
B Major example with key signature.png
Screen Shot 2017-10-02 at 1.42.38 PM.png

Diane Hidy's Sightreading Flashcards Book Three (Studio License

13.99

One thing that’s always frustrated me about sight reading materials is that there is never enough. My students need a lot of examples within the same category. That’s one of many reasons I created my own sight reading materials.

This 32 page book contains 129 separate flashcards to help you teach melodic reading.

Just like a good fitness trainer works on individual muscles and groups of muscles, (not just switching tasks wildly —“Let’s do one exercise for your left knee. Now let’s do one for your right elbow!”) one needs to do many different but similar examples in order to develop fluency. Comfort and fluency only develop from doing enough reading to develop an immediate keyboard response to the written music.

A colleague of mine, whom I consider one of the world’s best sight readers, once gave me some advice. “Becoming a great sight reader is about learning the conventional patterns in typical meters. The whacky stuff you really can’t prepare for… the recognizable and common patterns of music are what you have to know cold.”

That’s exactly what my sight reading materials are intended to do — Help your students learn to fluently read the everyday patterns found in music.

Here are some ways I like to use these melodic flashcards:

  • Read through one entire set at a lesson.
  • Teach key signatures using the four flashcards printed both with and without key signatures.
  • Assign a set to learn at home.
  • Assign one per day for a student to learn on their own.
  • Play each example before the student tries to play it — combine sight reading with ear training.
  • Show a student two similar flashcards. Play one and see if the student can identify which one you played. Help them hear the differences and what each pattern sounds like.

Each key begins with one page of flashcards without key signature followed by the same flashcards printed with a key signature. This provides a great opportunity to help students read and understand the way key signatures work.

These are followed by eight more flashcards printed using the key signature.

Here are some of the reasons all the flashcards in this book are in 6/8 time.

  • The natural lilt and momentum of the meter.
  • An abundance of melodic eighth notes.
  • Notes with beams are easier to read than notes without beams (eighths are easier to read than half notes, for instance).
  • The focus is on melodic reading, not decoding different meters (that’s a separate skill.)
  • 6/8 is one of the most pleasurable and least well-taught of the meters.

I wish you every success using my Sightreading Flashcards!

 Diane Hidy

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